A whole lot of awkward

who-:

Norways powerful memorial shows a cut within nature

On July 22, 2011, an island in Norway called Utøya made headlines when right-wing extremist Anders Behring Breivik opened fire at those at a youth camp there, killing 69 people in an unspeakable act of violence. Coupled with Breivik’s first attack, a car bomb explosion in Oslo that killed eight people, a total of 77 lives were tragically lost in the deadliest attack in Norway since World War II. The act of terrorism created a shock felt throughout the world.
To commemorate the lives lost, an international competition was held to design official memorial sites. A committee received 300 submissions from creatives including architects and artists from 46 countries. Just last month, the winner was announced. Swedish artist Jonas Dahlberg’s design of a symbolic wound, or a cut within nature, was unanimously chosen for being “artistically highly original and interesting.” It is called Memory Wound. As the jury wrote, “The proposal is radical and brave, and evokes the tragic events in a physical and direct manner.”
The cut is a three-and-a-half-meter wide excavation on the Sørbråten peninsula, which faces the island of Utøya. The gap will now make it impossible to reach the end of the headland. The names of the victims will be engraved onto a wall but visitors will not be able to touch them. This is meant to evoke “the sense of sudden loss combined with the long-term missing and remembrance of those who perished.”
The landmass, taken out of the rocky landscape, will be transplanted to another memorial site in Oslo where it will be used to create a temporary memorial pathway. The proposal also calls for trees to be taken from the island and moved to Oslo, to maintain the relationship between the two sites. (original post)

who-:

Norways powerful memorial shows a cut within nature

On July 22, 2011, an island in Norway called Utøya made headlines when right-wing extremist Anders Behring Breivik opened fire at those at a youth camp there, killing 69 people in an unspeakable act of violence. Coupled with Breivik’s first attack, a car bomb explosion in Oslo that killed eight people, a total of 77 lives were tragically lost in the deadliest attack in Norway since World War II. The act of terrorism created a shock felt throughout the world.

To commemorate the lives lost, an international competition was held to design official memorial sites. A committee received 300 submissions from creatives including architects and artists from 46 countries. Just last month, the winner was announced. Swedish artist Jonas Dahlberg’s design of a symbolic wound, or a cut within nature, was unanimously chosen for being “artistically highly original and interesting.” It is called Memory Wound. As the jury wrote, “The proposal is radical and brave, and evokes the tragic events in a physical and direct manner.”

The cut is a three-and-a-half-meter wide excavation on the Sørbråten peninsula, which faces the island of Utøya. The gap will now make it impossible to reach the end of the headland. The names of the victims will be engraved onto a wall but visitors will not be able to touch them. This is meant to evoke “the sense of sudden loss combined with the long-term missing and remembrance of those who perished.”

The landmass, taken out of the rocky landscape, will be transplanted to another memorial site in Oslo where it will be used to create a temporary memorial pathway. The proposal also calls for trees to be taken from the island and moved to Oslo, to maintain the relationship between the two sites. (original post)

(via ileftmyheartinedinburgh)

streetartglobal:

Walls with ears - how very topical! Reminds me of Milan’s Urban Solid group, who are coming to London soon!

streetartglobal:

Walls with ears - how very topical! Reminds me of Milan’s Urban Solid group, who are coming to London soon!

designcloud:

The Calligraphy Post.

A few days ago I bought a course "Introduction of the Art of Modern Calligraphy" by Molly Jacques, which you should definitely check, and I fell in love with calligraphy.

Now I find this useful infographic with the basics of calligraphy, including tools. In case you want to try your skills you should try to do those exercise. 

In both cases, (the classes from molly and this infographic) they ask you simple tools to begining your training:

Books.

In case you’re most an analog vintage retro-old guy, and you prefer to read a real book that stuck your nose in a monitor these are cool option for calligraphy beginners (the last to images):

Here are the last useful links:

In case you’re lazy or calligraphy simple isn’t your thing download the font (used on this post): http://myfonts.us/8eK7dW

The Class of Molly Jacques: http://skl.sh/1bWpr9p

Source of the infographic: us.moo.com

brain-food:

What if instead of throwing your pencil stubs away when they´re too short to use, you could plant them, add some water and watch them grow? Meet Sprout, a pencil with a seed! The high quality pencil features a water activated capsule at its tip, when the pencil is too short to use, you can plant it and have it grow into something delicious, beautiful and fun. Sprout comes in a variety of different flavors, from flowers, to herbs and vegies. A great idea to make writing fun again. watch the video

Funded by a successful kickstarter campaign, the Sprout Pencil is now available for purchase at amazon and in Europe at firebox

(via timestopsfornobody)

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding
Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.
Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding

Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.

Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

(via themoderat)

likeafieldmouse:

Beili Liu - Void (2008-9)

Each of the 49 layers of silk organza holds a delicate ring drawn with a burning incense. Each ring reduces in size until it recedes to a small circle. Through the void of the layering black silk, the spectator is drawn to a subtle hint of light at the end of the portal.”